"The Marsha Warfield Show" - May 23, 1990,

Earth Day,

Transcribed by, Cookie

 

 

[audience applause]

 

[Marsha Warfield]

"It's long past Earth Day. Do you know where your garbage is?"

 

[audience]

"yeah"

[Marsha]

"Or do you really care?"

 

 

[audience responds again]

 

[Marsha]

"Can one person make a difference?"

 

 

[audience responds again]

 

[Marsha]

"Well, the environmentalists are mad as Hell and they're no going to take it anymore. They're after you to stop polluting with your disposable diapers, your Styrofoam cups and your aerosol cans. But some people feel that if it was up to them there still be dinosaurs running around."

 

 

[laughter]

 

[Marsha]

"Since we can't say `stop the world, I want to get off', what can we do? We'll see if we can find the answers to these questions and many more with my guests the very earthy Olivia Newton-John and, from a man who's definitely out of this world, `Quantum Leap's', Dean Stockwell. We'll be back after these commercials."

 

 

[environmental fact shown: To produce one pound of beef, enough for one fast food hamburger, 55 square feet of rainforest would need to be cleared for grazing.]

 

[commercial break]

 

[Marsha]

"We're back, we're talking about Earth Day. You know it's over, but was it just an event, was it a hip thing to be part of? Anybody thinks that Earth Day was kind of trendy?"

 

[walks over to a male audience

member]

"Do you really think that one person could make a difference?"

 

[male audience member]

"I think if you try...to recycle"

 

[Marsha]

"And how? Recycle what?

 

[male audience member]

"Recycle paper, glass, a lot of things that you throw away, things that I throw away all the time and I need to throw away now, I mean recycle now."

 

 

[audience laughs]

 

[Marsha]

"OK, but if you go to McDonald's and they put your hamburger in a piece of paper and then they put that piece of paper in the Styrofoam box, are you going to say, `Hey, take that out of there! Recycle!'?"

 

[male audience member]

"Probably not."

 

[Marsha]

"So, can you really make a difference?"

 

[male audience

member]

"I think you still can."

[Marsha - walking away from that audience member]

"What can you do to make a difference?"

 

[audience shouting various things]

 

[to a female audience member]

"OK, now, wait a minute. Now tell me. What
did you say?"

 

[female audience member]

"Don't go there. Go some place else."

 

[audience applause]

 

[Marsha - to another female audience member]

"Come over here and meet me in the middle."

[female audience member]

"My question is, now, we're talking about the ozone layer, that's part of it, right?"

 

[Marsha]

"Right."

 

[female audience member]

"So why are we, well, the government, or whoever, are sending up rockets every 5 minutes, tearing all these holes in the ozone layer and what we're going to breathe after a while? That's my question."

 

[Marsha]

"All right."

 

 

[audience applause]

 

[another female audience member]

"I don't think that one person can do it, I don't think...it's too late now because they've already dug the hole for us...it's too late so we just have to deal with it."

 

[Marsha]

"Just live with it, all right."

 

 

[audience applause]

[Marsha]

"All right, all right. I'm going to have to lean over you
a minute."

 

[another male audience member]

"If we take that action with everything, I mean, we're gonna have, ya know, what is this, I mean, this is our world, this is...we're here to live on it right now, and if we...we're messing it up, we're not going to be having anything, we should take pride in what we have. And this is our Earth and it where we're going to stay."

 

[Marsha]

"All right."

 

[moving on to another audience

member]

"Are you going to take responsibility for polluting our planet?"

[female audience

member]

"Well, I'm going to take some of the responsibility, `cause I know I'm guilty because I use the little bags for trash, but I also use paper bags, and like, you know I'm thinking like as far as McDonald's and the fast food places, they put
your foods in those containers to keep stuff hot, but they can use those, um, like aluminium foil, you can save that stuff and you get lots of money because we save cans, we save bottles, and if you separate them, those are little things you can do."

 

[Marsha]

"How do you know what's bio-degradable? Is aluminium bio-
degradable?"

 

[female audience member]

"No, but it's recyclable, so that's still one way of helping."

[Marsha]

"Then why don't we recycle the little boxes? The little Styrofoam boxes?"

 

[female audience member]

"They don't break down. You could bury that stuff and it'll stay there forever. Just like that baby diapers, but like for me, when I have babies, I use cotton diapers."


[audience applauds]

 

"I mean, if you're in the house with a washer and dryer, you've got to wash everything else, so you might as well wash the diapers."

 

[Marsha]

"We'll be back with my guests, Olivia Newton-John and Dean
Stockwell after this commercial."

 

 

[environmental fact shown: It takes an entire forest, more than 500,000 trees, to supply Americans with their weekly Sunday newspaper.]

 

[commercial break]

 

[show returns with garbage scene clip from "Quantum Leap" episode - "Sea Bride"]

 

[Marsha]

"Well, please help me welcome my guests, the lovely Olivia
Newton-John and `Quantum Leap's' equally lovely, Dean Stockwell."

 

 

[audience cheers and applauds as Olivia and Dean, with a book in hand, walk on the stage]

 

[Marsha]

"Good morning, good morning, welcome, thank you for being here."

 

[Dean]

"Good morning, it's a pleasure being here. Yeah, this is great."

[Marsha]

"Good, now, we're talking about Earth Day. Is it a trendy thing?"

 

[Olivia]

"It has to be every day. Earth Day is not just one day of the year, it has to be every day. You know, I was really impressed, I was listening to some of you, of the audience when I was upstairs in the dressing room, and I'm really thrilled that even some people thought it was trendy, we still got through to a lot of people and that they are informed and they wanted...they cared. That's really what it's all about. And I think it was great."

 

 

[audience applauds]

[Marsha]

"Is the...is the commitment at this point more verbal than physical? Are people giving lip-service to the idea of Earth Day and saving the planet and in actuality not doing the things we need?"

 

[Dean]

"There was time not too long, I remember very vividly, from the 60's onto now when the first awareness of a problem with the environment came along when if someone mentioned the word `environment', people would say, `what does that mean?' Or `ecology, what does that mean?' And if you tried to explain what it meant, then you were a liberal and everybody forgot about you. Now, people are realizing that the problem is in our laps, it's in the air, it's all over the place, it's not lip-service, it's serious and people are starting to take it seriously and realizing that they can do something about it."

 

[Marsha]

"What?"

 

[Dean]

"Lots of stuff."

 

[Marsha]

"I mean, I'm an average person, and I'm saving twist ties and stuff like that,..."

 

[Dean]

"Good!"

 

[Olivia]

"Good, that's a start."

 

[Marsha]

"...but I'm just saying, but it seems to me that they, that we got nuclear waste in our air and water, what is saving my twist ties going to do?"

 

[Olivia]

"Well, it first starts with believing yourself, it all starts with empowering yourself with the belief that you can make a difference `cause one girl earlier said `I don't believe one person...', well one person can't but if everybody believes that `I can', then we all will, and if we all do just one thing, if we start with recycling, if we put water savers in California, we have a terrible water problem, we need to save water, we need to conserve. I brought along a book that I think kind of is a great thing for everyone to get called, '50 Simple Things You Can Do to Save the
Earth'. They just put one out for kids, `cause our kids are going to be the ones facing this dilemma when they grow up and they have to incorporate it into their everyday lives, so this kind of tells you everything."

 

[Dean]

"You had a girl here ask a question about `what can I do because the government sending up rockets, making holes in the ozone layer, what can I do?' Well, that's a lack of dearth of information. The ozone layer is a protective shield around the Earth, it's a life-support system, and there's global vandalism going on making holes in it and thinning it out. What happens is this chemical that industry has come up with, technology has come up with in use for our lazy well-being. Without thinking about it, these chemicals release certain little particles that go up in the air, because they're lighter than air and they go up and up and they take 20 to 50 years to get up to the part in the atmosphere where this layer is around protecting us from rays from the Sun which gives you cancer. Skin cancer. Now these little particles take all these years to get up there and they make holes in it. There's a recent NASA report from 1988 is recently being released, that there's a 15 hundred percent increase in skin cancer since the mid-30's. Fifteen hundred percent
increase. It used to be a thing that old people got, now it's the very young people are getting it."

 

[Marsha]

"But doesn't air travel and things like that have something to do with destroying that ozone layer, too?"

 

[Dean]

"No, it doesn't, no. There's certain chemicals only that are combining with the molecules in this ozone layer and destroy them. They are called CFCs - chlorofluorocarbons. Where are they? They're in your air conditioning in your car, they're in your refrigerator, they're in rigid foam, like, you know, if you take a, you know your beer chest that you take out to the ballgame, if you crush that or burn it, inside the bubbles of that are enough of these little chlorofluorocarbons to go up and make the hole a football field larger - and it is."

 

[Marsha]

"But why don't we deal with the plant that makes that stuff instead of dealing with me, the consumer, that bought it?"

 

 

[applause]

 

[Marsha]

"And now, but before we go into that, I have a question here, the U.S. Interior Secretary, Manuel Lujan, Jr., he called for changes in the Endangered Species Act, asking the question, `do we have to save every species?'"

[Olivia]

"That made me so mad when I heard that!"

 

[Dean]

"He said every subspecies,...yes, we do have to save every subspecies."

 

[Marsha]

"Well, what about the facts that if it was up to saving all the subspecies, we would still have dinosaurs and dodo birds and what would we do with them? I mean, is the average person being expected to keep an elephant because we might not have them later?"

 

[Olivia]

"Yes, because I think that our children should be entitled to have those animals, those animals are all part of this world and we're all part of a chain, and whether or we know it or not, we're linked together in some way. And if we're saying that we have, I don't think human beings have the right to just wipe out a species, we're talking about, I mean, if you really think about it, to knock out a race that will never be here again, that's a pretty terrible thing that we're doing on this planet and we all deserve to live, every species does."

 

 

[applause]

 

[Marsha]

"What's the difference between...what's the difference between evolution and just an eco-change and the rape of the planet?"

 

[Olivia]

"Well, you said it right there."

 

[Marsha]

"But what is it?"

 

[Dean]

"Evolution is something nature is in control of. The rape of a planet is something that the egocentric, egotistical one race, the human race, is doing. That's where morality comes into it."

 

[Olivia]

"Nature is in balance with itself and before we, before man came along and started plundering and everything is for the green dollar, animals lived in harmony. An animal would not go out and kill a whole herd. It would kill one, just enough to eat and survive. Men don't have the same balance in life, they have this power thing that we can just kill anything, take anything over, and we haven't left room for the animals let alone for our own cultures, like the Indians and such, so it's really, we're out of bounds."

 

 

[applause]

 

[Marsha]

"We're all going to take our leather shoe-wearing selves to commercial and come back see what the difference is between evolution and change."

 

 

[applause]

 

 

[environmental fact shown: Plant and animal species are becoming extinct at the rate of 100 per day]

 

[commercial break]

 

[Marsha]

"We're back and talking about Earth Day. We've identified
the ozone layer as a definite problem. I would like to know from our
audience what are some of your other concerns, what bothers you
that's going on then."

 

[female audience member]

"The water, you know how sometimes when you drive down a street, and you see that they're watering and then the water is all out and that just aggravates me to no end. Today I washed my car, so I used the bucket of water and then I just rinsed my car and that was it. And that's what aggravates me with the water."

 

 

[applause]

 

[Marsha]

"All right, but, now there's a commercial on television where they pull a car out, they say if you want to test this wax, just add water and they dump about 40 billion gallons of water on one car to make a point. Where does the responsible...Here's a lady who's being very responsible, how do we regulate the media?"

[Dean]

"You call them!"

 

[Olivia]

"You call and you write letters."

 

[Dean]

"You call them up on the phone and say, `Hey, we're trying to save water. What are you people doing with your commercials?' You call this, you know there's this copying thing, they're talking about this lady, I just destroyed all these things what do I do and the good guy tells her what to do. Doesn't recycle the paper. She says `I destroyed a million memos, what do I do?' You call up, you say `C'mon, let's recycle, let's do something.'"

 

[Olivia]

"Make them responsible. We all have to do something. You seen how in the last year what people have done, they have taken down the walls in Europe, we can do incredible things, we can force companies into change or make them feel good guys like Heinz, stop killing the dolphins because of pressure put on by the public, they want to be good guys."

 

[Marsha]

"We have people taking television shows off the air because they don't particularly like them. Do these groups actually represent a large enough segment to make that decision? Are people making decisions for us that are not ours?"

 

[Dean]

"When it has to do with our health and our children's health, I don't care what you take off the air."

 

[Olivia]

"That's right."

 

[Dean]

"Take it off."

 

[Marsha]

"All right, but I mean, you know, what do they make video tape out of? Is it recyclable? What do they make records out of? That's made from a petroleum product. Are we going to stop recording? Are we going to stop putting this stuff on tape?"

 

[Olivia]

"When you can make changes, you should, actually they are making cassette tape covers out of recycled, um, disposable diapers, believe it or not. So you are seeing changes."

 

[Dean]

"You're going to be surprised..."

 

[Marsha]

"You know there some people what they say about that music
is right."

 

 

[laughter and applause]

 

[another female audience member]

"Just a second ago, we were talking about water and all that, I would like to know what the average person can do to help to not pollute the ocean."

 

[Olivia]

"That's a good one. You know the six-packs, when you have the plastic rings that go `round, make sure you snip them and try not to drop them on the ground, put them in recycle or in the trash, but definitely snip them because birds and fish eat them, it looks like food to them, for some reason, looks like the jelly fish, and plastic bags, so you need to snip them and throw them away. Plastic bags,
dispose of them."

 

[Marsha]

"But you know what I am more concerned about?"

 

[Olivia]

"What?

 

[Marsha]

"Isn't anyone more concerned about medical waste showing up on the beach?"

 

[Dean]

"No. No."

 

[Marsha]

"...in Texas and such?"

 

[Dean]

"No. No. No."

 

[Marsha]

"You're not more concerned about syringes coming up on the beach where children can be..."

 

[Dean]

"I'll tell you what I'm most concerned about. Marsha. No."

 

[Olivia]

"I am about all of it."

 

[Dean]

"I am concerned about, you know what the most life-supporting system in the ocean is and one of the main systems for the planet is? It's plankton. You know what plankton is? Plankton is almost microscopic form of life, that lives all through the ocean, all the other systems in ocean life that feed on it. The plankton is in
mortal danger from ultra-violet radiation coming through the holes in the ozone layer. Yes!"

 

[Marsha]

"OK, so what about this feeling of helplessness that most of us might have? What are we going to do?"

 

[Dean]

"OK, what do you do? What do you do? You've got an AC in your car, an air conditioner in your car. You diagnose it, you check it out. But you check it out and you call the place, and you say, `Do you have a Freon recovering machine?', something that will take the Freon, is the CFC, in your AC and your refrigerator and in Heylon (sp?) fire extinguishers, that's stuff is the stuff that's hitting the layer. You call and say, `Do you have a recycling machine that will handle Freon?' In my AC? And in my refrigerator?"

 

[Marsha]

"Who's going to do that?"

 

[male audience member]

"That not really what I want to talk about. My main concern is what we're doing to the rainforest. Without that, we're not going to be able to rebuild that ozone layer."

 

 

[applause]

[male audience member]

"With it, we can."

 

[Marsha]

"But, now, you know, about rainforests and stuff too, they tell us to use paper products because they're recyclable, but we also have a problem with the rainforests - well where does the paper come from?"

 

[Olivia]

"Some of the paper comes from the rainforest, a lot of the paper comes from our own national forests in America that's being cut down just as fast a rate as the rainforest in the rest of the world. But it's not only the forest we need for oxygen, it's the ocean, the algae in the ocean, am I right?"

 

[Marsha]

"Sounds to me like the whole world is going to Hell in a hand-basket, so why is it, I mean every time we come up with a solution, there's another problem?"

 

[another male audience member]

"You know, I wanted to say something about the water here in California and about the overall problem, and we're being asked as consumers to save 10 percent of our water usage, but it turns out that we as consumers only use 4 percent of the water in the state of California. Eighty-five percent of the water in this state is used by agriculture. And they have the worst arrogation system ever."

 

 

[applause]

 

[male audience member]

"Now you can tie that in with the rainforests, the syringes and all those other problems because our economic system, capitalism, is going to make money and that's what it's designed for, and really as far, as long as that system is being perpetuated, we're not important, the movers and the shakers make the decisions. Money is what talks."

 

 

 

[applause]

 

[Dean - during the applause]

"Don't give up! Don't give up!"

[Marsha yelling over Dean's voice]

"Well, don't give up, but he's right because we do have to go to commercial right now. We'll be back with my guests Olivia Newton-John and Dean Stockwell right after these words."

 

 

[commercial break]

 

[Marsha]

"We're back and we're in the middle of a very heated discussion. And before I thank my guests for being here, `cause we cannot solve this problem in this half-hour. We have to remember that the Earth can survive without us, we cannot survive without it."

 

[Dean]

"Right on."

 

[Marsha]

"So, I would like to thank you my guest, Olivia Newton-John. You would like to say..."

 

[Olivia]

"Thank you. I just would like to say that I'm involved in this because I have a little girl and she is the future and we can't give up, we have to make to make this right for our children and teach them how to live in a good way so they can pass on to their kids, you know, we have to keep going here. And Dean too."

 

[Marsha]

"And thank you very much Dean Stockwell for being here. And you say..."

 

[Dean - holding up a book]

"Check out this book, "The Earth Right", by Liz Higgins (?), it's a wonderful book. If anyone wants to talk to me after the show about the ozone, I'll talk to them, I'd tried to say everything I could."

 

[Marsha]

"All right, everybody, do what you can. We'll be back with some more interesting people and talk about some more interesting stuff. Have a real good day. Bye-bye."

 

 

THE END

1